University of Minnesota
Asian Languages & Literature
all@umn.edu
612-625-6534


Asian Languages and Literature.

Christine L Marran

612/625-0174
Asian Languages/Literatures 230C Folwell Hall 9 Pleasant St SE

Department Affiliations

University Affiliations

  • Liberal Arts: Moving Image Studies Graduate Minor [Website]

Narrative

Christine Marran is an associate professor in Japanese literature and cultural studies at the University of Minnesota. Her first book, Poison Woman: Figuring the Transgressive Woman, investigates the powerful icon of the transgressive woman, its shifting meanings, and its influence on defining women’s sexuality and place from its inception in the 1870s. Marran’s work since the publication of her book on gender has primarily turned to the study of the environmental aesthetics and the place of animals in Japanese literature and visual culture. She is currently completing a book manuscript on writers and filmmakers whose work represents what she calls the environmental turn in literature and culture in Japan’s postwar industrial period. She argues that this turn marks a shift in writing on nature and the environment. The material world of nature as described as a system“”its ecological principles that signal feedback loops and symbiotic relations“”are the foundation for this new aesthetics of the environmental turn that works in the modality of the bios. She shows how, prior to this environmental turn, philosophers and writers throughout Japan’s industrial history have mused about Japan and its nature plenty but this conjuring of nature has been, in the main, toward an articulation of nature for human culture“”a particular insistence on nature as symbol, metaphor, or place name rather than a material environment that connects the human to the biotic world. She rethinks the literary canon and national cinema and shows that works of the environmental turn are not limited to depicting human culture in terms of ethnic or national belonging. Rather, they demand new protocols for reading and viewing that encourage an understanding of biotic relations, which include but inevitably trump ethnic and national ones. Gender continues to be an important element in her work for understanding the ways in which toxins and other material aspects of industrial culture affects bodies differently. She has also written various articles on dolphins, wolves, insects, and other creatures in literary and visual culture.


Specialties

  • Ecocriticism
  • Understanding the biotic world in representation
  • Gender and sexuality in print and film culture
  • Japanese and Asian film
  • Modern Japanese literature

Educational Background

  • Ph. D.: Modern Japanese Literature, University of Washington.

Publications

  • Marran, Christine L. ""An Animal Stranger in a Tokyo Canal"." Japan at Nature’s Edge: The Environmental Context of a Global Power (2013)
  • Marran, Christine L. "“Visibility and Invisibility in Photography of 3.11"." Environmental History April (2012)
  • Marran, Christine L. "“The Nature of Contamination: From Minamata to Fukushima“." Asia-Pacific Journal May (2011)
  • Marran, Christine L. "“The Metamorphic and Microscopic in Tezuka Osamu’s Graphic Novels“." Mechademia 8 (forthcoming)
  • "Beyond Domesticating Animal Love": Marran, Christine, University of Minnesota Press, Mechademia 6: User Enhanced, 2011.
  • Marran, Christine L. Poison Woman: Figuring Female Transgression in Modern Japanese Culture. University of Minnesota Press, 2007.

Research Activities

  • Fellow at University of Minnesota's Institute for Advanced Study: At the IAS, I worked on my book manuscript "Biotropes: Aesthetics for an Industrial Age." The conjuring of nature in Japanese literature has been primarily toward an articulation of nature for human culture“”a particular insistence on nature as symbol, metaphor, or place toward imperial and ethnic politics rather than as a material environment that connects the human to the biotic world. In my book, I present alternative approaches to environmental writing that embrace the biotic world as a system and demand an understanding of biotic relations, which include but inevitably trump ethnic and national ones. l describe this new treatment of space and nature as foundational for an aesthetics that works in the modality of the bios. , September 2011 - January 2012

Awards

  • Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, UM, September 2011 - January 2012
  • Fellow at Cornell University Society for the Humanities, Fall 2008 - Spring 2009
  • Institute for Advanced Study Fellow, University of Minnesota, Fall 2006
  • William Sauter LaPorte '28 Princeton University Preceptor, 2002 - 2005
  • Kansai University Faculty Fellow, 2003
  • Social Science Research Council Advanced Research Grant, 2002
  • Travel Grant, University Committee on Research in the Humanities, Princeton, 2002

Courses Taught

  • ALL 1905 The Animal
  • ALL 1001 - Asian Film & Animation
  • ALL 3920 Bios-Japan
  • ALL 5177 - Women's Writing in Japan
  • ALL 5466 - Japanese Popular Culture in a Global Context
  • ALL 5920 Cinematic Ecologies
Alternative Output Formats Alternative Output Formats